Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Contain and Amplify - NYTimes.com

Contain and Amplify - NYTimes.com:



"The Arab world is a pluralistic region that lacks pluralism — the ability to manage and embrace differences peacefully. As such, the Middle East’s pluralistic character — Sunnis, Shiites, Kurds, Christians, Druze, Alawites, Jews, Copts, Yazidis, Turkmen and an array of tribes — has long been managed by iron fists from above. But after we removed the fists in Iraq and Libya, without putting a new bottom-up order in place, and the people themselves tried to remove the fists in Syria and Yemen, without putting a new live-and-let-live order in place, a horrifying war of all against all has exploded."



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Thursday, May 21, 2015

Guatemalan President Dismisses a Close Aide - NYTimes.com

Guatemalan President Dismisses a Close Aide - NYTimes.com:



"MEXICO CITY — Facing a political crisis that has led to mass demonstrations and calls for his resignation, President Otto Pérez Molina of Guatemala shook up his cabinet on Thursday, dismissing one of his closest ministers."



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6-Year-Old’s Murder Has Mexicans Seeking Answers to Youth Violence - NYTimes.com

6-Year-Old’s Murder Has Mexicans Seeking Answers to Youth Violence - NYTimes.com:



"MEXICO CITY — The case has caused a wave of anguish: A 6-year-old boy in northern Mexico murdered and a group of five adolescents, who the authorities said were playing a game of “kidnap,” apprehended for the crime."



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In ‘Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life,’ Nature Melds With the Artist Herself - NYTimes.com

In ‘Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life,’ Nature Melds With the Artist Herself - NYTimes.com:



"THE first Frida moment occurs right off the bat in “Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life” at the New York Botanical Garden.

"



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A Finance Minister Fit for a Greek Tragedy? - NYTimes.com

A Finance Minister Fit for a Greek Tragedy? - NYTimes.com:



"Yanis Varoufakis knows when he will go. “I’m not going to humiliate myself, and I’m not going to become compromised in terms of principles and in terms of logic,” he told me in early May. The Greek finance minister had just returned to Athens from a hopscotch tour of European capitals, during which he warned his fellow European leaders that they faced a Continental crisis: If they didn’t lend money to his ailing country soon, Greece might end up forced to leave the eurozone. And yet Greece wouldn’t accept many of the conditions they were demanding in return. He sounded angry. “I’ll be damned if I will accept another package of economic policies that perpetuate this same crisis. This is not what I was elected for.” He would resign, he said, rather than push the Greek people deeper into economic despair: “It’s not good for Europe, and it’s not good for Greece.”"



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